Sunday, February 23, 2014

Bishop Street by Rene D. Schultz, A Book Review


 
This story is an experience you won't soon forget.  It's a story about four children who grew up in an orphanage unwanted, unloved, and clinging to each other for hope.  Four children had an entrenched hope they would be adopted and daily prayer they would even survive their mostly ugly and unhappy journey.

Hope is all they thought their camaraderie was, but years later they discovered that no matter what happened or why they were together in that rigid loveless orphanage, they cared deeply for each other.

I was drawn to this story because I have always had a tender heart for children without families.  As a child I just couldn't understand it, and wondered why other families didn't make sure no child had to endure that.  Of course growing up, maturity makes you see things differently, but it doesn't necessarily change how you feel about it, and I still have a hard time accepting our society's shortfalls.

'What doesn't break you will make you stronger' has certainly been proven time and again, and these children had no choice but to see that song through.  Each one's test was different in execution, but ultimately culminated to the same tune. 

Each child's maturity into adult brought its own set of obstacles, trials and tribulations, but one core emotion ran steady through each of them.  That solid feeling of family and the need for one, and it never wavered in their souls.  It's strong and taut thread kept them searching for solace and peace of mind, and yet striving to bury the very reason for their plight.  Their search and then their quick need to justify situations kept them mollified a day at a time, because they couldn't fathom what or how to massage their empty hearts.  One space, the one for family, just couldn't be filled.  It was an emptiness that led them down many roads, each one just as barren as the next.

For some it looked like the perfect life on the outside, but was total terror and sadness on the inside.  Creating what they craved brought some happiness, but still left a hole in their heart that sought to be filled.  And then some seek to anesthetize the pain, some with mind altering substances, some with work, and some with isolation.  These four children sought all of them, and realized one day that family wasn't just a mom and dad.

Taking this journey with these four children into adult was touching and uplifting.  What they endured and then accomplished gives the reader a feeling of empowerment and hope just like they had.  It's a good story that everyone will enjoy.